Category Archives: Cameroon

#RtoPWeekly: 30 September – 4 October

Weekly

This Week in Focus:
Plan of Action on Hate Speech and the RtoP

The 74th session of the UN General Assembly has come to a close, but not without several interesting and notable RtoP-related conversations.

One event entitled, “Confronting Hate and Protecting Rights” was held to discuss the UN Strategy and Plan of Action on Hate Speech. The Plan of Action addresses the root causes and drivers of hate as well as the impact on victims. An interactive panel including UN Under-Secretary-General and Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide, Mr. Adama Dieng, who spoke of the ability for hate speech to be an indicator of mass atrocities, and that incitement to violence is included under RtoP. Hate speech and violence against minority groups continues to rise, and recognizing it requires accurate monitoring and identification, so the necessary actors can understand which communities are vulnerable, as well as the types of threats and its sources. Panelists spoke of the need for honest reporting on hate speech to increase its visibility, but noted that today’s hate speech is spread through social media such as WhatsApp and Facebook, which is harder to monitor and respond to in a timely manner.

A second event, “A Pathway to a Sustainable Solution to the Rohingya Crisis” was held by the Permanent Mission of Bangladesh, and detailed the plight of the 1.1 million Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh. Throughout its participation in various events around UNGA, Bangladesh called on the international community to assist them in protecting the Rohingya people within its borders, and reminding the international community of their obligations under Pillar Two of the RtoP, in helping both Bangladesh and Burma to ensure the safe and voluntary return of refugees. The event also outlined the current challenges in the crises, noting that attempts at repatriation have failed due to the mistrust between the Rohingya and the Burmese government, as well as an unwillingness of the Burmese government to address the structural and legal discrimination against the Rohingya, reinstate land rights, freedom of movement, and the right to citizenship, as well as ensuring accountability.

As part of the event, the Attorney General of the Gambia, Ba Tambadou, announced and detailed plans to file a case against Burma at the International Court of Justice (ICJ). Mr. Tambadou described the events as “textbook acts calculated to destroy a people,” Adding that though genocide is committed by individuals, who should be held accountable, states also have a responsibility to protect and prevent and the Gambia’s case aims to underscore Burma’s failure to do so.

Rohingya  refugees  exhausted  streaming  off  boats  arriving
(Photo via the World Bank)


What to Watch:

Venezuela: UN Creates Independent Investigative Body (Human Rights Watch)
The UN Human Rights Council (HRC) adopted a resolution to create an independent fact-finding body to investigate alleged human rights violations in Venezuela since 2014. The body aims to ensure accountability for those who have committed such crimes, which include extrajudicial executions, enforced disappearances, arbitrary arrests, and torture. The HRC calls upon Venezuelan authorities to cooperate with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), and failure to do so will result in the creation of a full commission of inquiry. The OHCHR body also hopes its work will ensure redress and access to justice for victims.

Bosnia and Herzegovina: The memory of Srebrenica is fading away (Al-Jazeera)
This opinion piece talks of the importance of memorialization in preventing future genocides. As ethnic and religious tensions continue to rise around the world, the author warns of the need for the experiences of survivors to help inform stakeholders’ future decisions. Understanding that what occurred in Srebrenica was not a once-off anomaly, but rather a long process of dehumanization and systematic extermination, is key to future prevention efforts. The danger of the creation of the “other” for political gain used to marginalize religious, ethnic, and minority groups, is evident in the past and current examples of mass atrocities in the world.


But Also Don’t Miss:

Cameroon: Cameroon dialogue starts as Anglophone separatists pull out
Cameroon’s national dialogue began Monday, marking two years since the conflict began, but several separatist leaders pulled out calling for international mediation.

Europe: Mounting Syrian War Crime Cases Raise Hopes For Justice Against A Brutal Regime
Victims of war crimes from Syria continue to file cases in European courts, citing universal jurisdiction.

Philippines: Filming the Philippines’ “War on Drugs”
International Criminal Court Prosecutors requested the submission of the new documentary “On the President’s Orders” to examine alleged government sanctioned crimes in the “war on drugs.”


Weekly Yazidi

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Filed under Burma, Cameroon, Europe, General Assembly, RtoP, Second Pillar, srebrenica, Uncategorized, Weekly Round-Up

#RtoPWeekly 3-6 September

Weekly

This week in focus:

Member States Revisit Commitments to Atrocity Prevention
in the Second UNGA debate on RtoP
 

Hello and welcome back to the RtoP Weekly! A lot happened while we were on break, but we’re looking forward to diving back in and resuming our publication.

On 27 June, the UN General Assembly held its second formal debate on the Responsibility to Protect since 2009. Common themes of the debate included the importance of the Human Rights Council and Treaty Bodies in upholding the RtoP, the importance of accountability mechanisms such as the ICC, IIIM for Syria, among others, and support for UN Plan of Action on Combating Hate Speech. The ICRtoP produced an infographic of the debate, which can be found here.

Ahead of the Formal Debate on the RtoP, the ICRtoP hosted a CSO Roundtable with the UN Special Advisor on the Responsibility to Protect, Ms Karen Smith. This off-the-record event helped to facilitate the channels of communication between civil society and the UN Officeon the Prevention of Genocide and the Responsibility to Protect on the UN Secretary-General’s Annual Report on the RtoP. This year’s Report focused on “Lessons Learned for Prevention,” and looks at state-based approaches to prevention and early action. In this vein, the Report calls upon member states to see actions such as countering hate speech, including women in peace dialogues, and implementing methods of self-review and monitoring as activities that can prevent the future occurrence of atrocities. An ICRtoP summary as well as an infographic on the report are available.

***Please take note that our website is currently under construction. If you need assistance in accessing ICRtoP materials, please contact us at info@responsibilitytoprotect.org***


What to Watch:

Burundi: CoI Presentation Report (OHCHR)

The UN Human Rights Council’s Commission of Inquiry (CoI) on Burundi released its 2019 report, in which they detail that the presented calm within the country is due to underlying state repression of rights, as seen through the government’s removal of foreign NGOs earlier this year. The Commission used the Framework of Analysis for Atrocity Crimes as part of its research methods, and in its press conference stated, “There is no better early warning than our risk analysis which should be carefully considered, if the often repeated commitments to prevention are to have any meaning.” Ahead of the 2020 elections the CoI’s findings continue to keep Burundi as a state at-risk for atrocities.


But Also Don’t Miss:

Cameroon: Separatist Leaders Appeal Conviction
Separatist leaders filed an appeal against the life sentences handed down to them via Military Tribunal last month, which raised serious concerns over rights violations and due process in the country.

Peacekeeping: Analyzing the Co-Evolution of the Responsibility to Protect and the Protection of Civilians in UN Peace Operations
The RtoP and Peacekeeping are closely linked and complementary – this article explores that normative relationship in practice.

Syria: At Least 98,000 Forcibly Disappeared Persons in Syria Since March 2011
Coalition member, Syrian Network for Human Rights, released several important reports this summer on arbitrary detention and enforced disappearances in Syria.

Syria: Syrians Deported by Lebanon Arrested at Home
Lebanon is forcibly returning Syrians and handing them over to state authorities, where several have been detained arbitrarily.

Venezuela: Joint NGO Q&A: Why a United Nations Inquiry Is Needed for Venezuela
11 National and international NGOs called on the UN Human Rights Council to form a Commission of Inquiry on Venezuela.


weekly pic 2

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Filed under Burma, Burundi, Cameroon, General Assembly, Peacekeeping, RtoP, Syria, UN, Uncategorized, Weekly Round-Up

#RtoPWeekly: 13-17 May

This week in focus:
Gender & Genocide and the Protection of Civilians

Working with the Global Justice Center, the ICRtoP will convene a panel discussion next Wednesday, 22 May, entitled “Gender and Genocide: Engendering analysis for better prevention, accountability, and protection,” as a side event to the UN Security Council Debate on the Protection of Civilians in Conflict.

The event looks to expand upon the Global Justice Center’s white paper, Beyond Killing: Gender, Genocide, and Obligations under International Law, released in December 2018, focusing on the unique ways women experience and are affected by genocidal violence. By bringing together experts from civil society, academia, and law, the discussion aims to raise awareness around the need for the inclusion of a gendered analysis to illuminate the multi-dimensional nature of atrocity crimes to prevent their occurrence, as a lack of gender-specificity in legal frameworks prevents the international community from effectively preventing and punishing atrocity crimes.

Full information on the event can be found here.

***Please note that we will be pausing RtoP Weekly publication for the time being. Thank you for your patience and understanding. We hope to be back in your inboxes soon!***


What to Watch:

Sudan: Sudan Talks Collapse Amid Clashes in Khartoum (New York Times)
Talks and negotiations over a transitional government in Sudan stalled on 16 May, in spite of earlier reports that both parties had agreed to a three-year transitional period. The situation deteriorated amidst the negotiations as state forced fired against protestors in an attempt to clear checkpoints in the city. Dialogues between military and civilian leaders in the days preceding seemed to be progressing, albeit slowly, over several rounds of negotiations and ongoing violence between security forces and protesters. Notably, prosecutors officially charged former Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir for “inciting and participating in” the killing of protesters in the mass demonstrations that led to the end of his regime last month.


But Also Don’t Miss:

Burma: UN Fact-Finding Mission Recommends Suspension of International Dealings with Myanmar’s Military
The head of the UN Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar urges the international community to end its support of the military following a tour of the country, citing a lack of accountability for actions against the Rohingya.

Cameroon: Hope for western Cameroon as Biya finally talks peace
After several high-profile events, President Biya is reportedly organizing a dialogue to address the conflict in the Anglophone regions.

Health Care in Conflict: Impunity Remains: 2018 Attacks on Health Care in 23 Countries in Conflict
The report notes increasing attacks on humanitarian workers and services in addition to providing recommendations for the UN, states, and other parties to a conflict.

Syria: Inside Syria’s Secret Torture Prisons: How Bashar al-Assad Crushed Dissent
The New York Times published an expose on detainment conditions under the Assad regime including details on torture and enforced disappearances.

Venezuela: Hunger for Justice: Crimes Against Humanity in Venezuela
Amnesty International’s new report on rights abuses under Nicolas Maduro’s regime documents systematic and widespread violations that may amount to crimes against humanity.

Venezuela: Venezuela peace talks taking place in Oslo: Norwegian media
Peace talks are reportedly taking place in Oslo, Norway between representatives of both Nicolas Maduro and Juan Guaido.

Yemen: Houthi withdrawal from Yemen ports going according to plan: UN
UN officials report the withdrawal of Houthi forces from Hodeidah is “going to plan.”



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Filed under Burma, Cameroon, Event, genocide, RtoP, Sudan, Syria, Venezuela, Weekly Round-Up, Women, Yemen